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41 results

2017


Thumb xl imahe toc
Soiled adhesive pads shear clean by slipping: a robust self-cleaning mechanism in climbing beetles

Amador, G., Endlein, T., Sitti, M.

Journal of The Royal Society Interface, 14(131):20170134, The Royal Society, June 2017 (article)

Abstract
Animals using adhesive pads to climb smooth surfaces face the problem of keeping their pads clean and functional. Here, a self-cleaning mechanism is proposed whereby soiled feet would slip on the surface due to a lack of adhesion but shed particles in return. Our study offers an in situ quantification of self-cleaning performance in fibrillar adhesives, using the dock beetle as a model organism. After beetles soiled their pads by stepping into patches of spherical beads, we found that their gait was significantly affected. Specifically, soiled pads slipped 10 times further than clean pads, with more particles deposited for longer slips. Like previous studies, we found that particle size affected cleaning performance. Large (45 μm) beads were removed most effectively, followed by medium (10 μm) and small (1 μm). Consistent with our results from climbing beetles, force measurements on freshly severed legs revealed larger detachment forces of medium particles from adhesive pads compared to a flat surface, possibly due to interlocking between fibres. By contrast, dock leaves showed an overall larger affinity to the beads and thus reduced the need for cleaning. Self-cleaning through slippage provides a mechanism robust to particle size and may inspire solutions for artificial adhesives.

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

2017

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


Thumb xl drotlef et al 2017 advanced materials
Bioinspired Composite Microfibers for Skin Adhesion and Signal Amplification of Wearable Sensors

Drotlef, D., Amjadi, M., Yunusa, M., Sitti, M.

Advanced Materials, May 2017, Back Cover (article)

Abstract
A facile approach is proposed for superior conformation and adhesion of wearable sensors to dry and wet skin. Bioinspired skin-adhesive films are composed of elastomeric microfibers decorated with conformal and mushroom-shaped vinylsiloxane tips. Strong skin adhesion is achieved by crosslinking the viscous vinylsiloxane tips directly on the skin surface. Furthermore, composite microfibrillar adhesive films possess a high adhesion strength of 18 kPa due to the excellent shape adaptation of the vinylsiloxane tips to the multiscale roughness of the skin. As a utility of the skin-adhesive films in wearable-device applications, they are integrated with wearable strain sensors for respiratory and heart-rate monitoring. The signal-to-noise ratio of the strain sensor is significantly improved to 59.7 because of the considerable signal amplification of microfibrillar skin-adhesive films.

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Recent Advances in Skin Penetration Enhancers for Transdermal Gene and Drug Delivery

Amjadia, M., Mostaghacia, B., Sittia, M.

Current Gene Therapy, 17, pages: 000-000, 2017 (article)

Abstract
There is a growing interest in transdermal delivery systems because of their noninvasive, targeted, and on-demand delivery of gene and drugs. However, efficient penetration of therapeutic compounds into the skin is still challenging largely due to the impermeability of the outermost layer of the skin, known as stratum corneum. Recently, there have been major research activities to enhance the skin penetration depth of pharmacological agents. This article reviews recent advances in the development of various strategies for skin penetration enhancement. We show that approaches such as ultrasound waves, laser, and microneedle patches have successfully been employed to physically disrupt the stratum corneum structure for enhanced transdermal delivery. Rather than physical approaches, several non-physical route have also been utilized for efficient transdermal delivery across the skin barrier. Finally, we discuss some clinical applications of transdermal delivery systems for gene and drug delivery. This paper shows that transdermal delivery devices can potentially function for diverse healthcare and medical applications while further investigations are still necessary for more efficient skin penetration of gene and drugs.

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

2016


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High-Performance Multiresponsive Paper Actuators

Amjadi, M., Sitti, M.

ACS nano, 10(11):10202-10210, American Chemical Society, October 2016 (article)

Abstract
There is an increasing demand for soft actuators because of their importance in soft robotics, artificial muscles, biomimetic devices, and beyond. However, the development of soft actuators capable of low-voltage operation, powerful actuation, and programmable shape-changing is still challenging. In this work, we propose programmable bilayer actuators that operate based on the large hygroscopic contraction of the copy paper and simultaneously large thermal expansion of the polypropylene film upon increasing the temperature. The electrothermally activated bending actuators can function with low voltages (≤ 8 V), low input electric power per area (P ≤ 0.14 W cm–2), and low temperature changes (≤ 35 °C). They exhibit reversible shape-changing behavior with curvature radii up to 1.07 cm–1 and bending angle of 360°, accompanied by powerful actuation. Besides the electrical activation, they can be powered by humidity or light irradiation. We finally demonstrate the use of our paper actuators as a soft gripper robot and a lightweight paper wing for aerial robotics.

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

2016

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


Thumb xl ye et al 2016 advanced materials
Gallium Adhesion: Phase Change of Gallium Enables Highly Reversible and Switchable Adhesion (Adv. Mater. 25/2016)

Ye, Z., Lum, G. Z., Song, S., Rich, S., Sitti, M.

Advanced Materials, 28(25):5087-5087, May 2016 (article)

Abstract
Gallium exhibits highly reversible and switchable adhesion when it undergoes a solid–liquid phase transition. The robustness of gallium is notable as it exhibits strong performance on a wide range of smooth and rough surfaces, under both dry and wet conditions. Gallium may therefore find numerous applications in transfer printing, robotics, electronic packaging, and biomedicine.

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


Thumb xl publications toc
Parallel microcracks-based ultrasensitive and highly stretchable strain sensors

Amjadi, M., Turan, M., Clementson, C. P., Sitti, M.

ACS applied materials \& interfaces, 8(8):5618-5626, American Chemical Society, Febuary 2016 (article)

Abstract
There is an increasing demand for flexible, skin-attachable, and wearable strain sensors due to their various potential applications. However, achieving strain sensors with both high sensitivity and high stretchability is still a grand challenge. Here, we propose highly sensitive and stretchable strain sensors based on the reversible microcrack formation in composite thin films. Controllable parallel microcracks are generated in graphite thin films coated on elastomer films. Sensors made of graphite thin films with short microcracks possess high gauge factors (maximum value of 522.6) and stretchability (ε ≥ 50%), whereas sensors with long microcracks show ultrahigh sensitivity (maximum value of 11 344) with limited stretchability (ε ≤ 50%). We demonstrate the high performance strain sensing of our sensors in both small and large strain sensing applications such as human physiological activity recognition, human body large motion capturing, vibration detection, pressure sensing, and soft robotics.

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


Thumb xl amjadi et al 2016 advanced functional materials
Stretchable, Skin-Mountable, and Wearable Strain Sensors and Their Potential Applications: A Review

Amjadi, M., Kyung, K., Park, I., Sitti, M.

Advanced Functional Materials, Febuary 2016 (article)

Abstract
There is a growing demand for flexible and soft electronic devices. In particular, stretchable, skin-mountable, and wearable strain sensors are needed for several potential applications including personalized health-monitoring, human motion detection, human-machine interfaces, soft robotics, and so forth. This Feature Article presents recent advancements in the development of flexible and stretchable strain sensors. The article shows that highly stretchable strain sensors are successfully being developed by new mechanisms such as disconnection between overlapped nanomaterials, crack propagation in thin films, and tunneling effect, different from traditional strain sensing mechanisms. Strain sensing performances of recently reported strain sensors are comprehensively studied and discussed, showing that appropriate choice of composite structures as well as suitable interaction between functional nanomaterials and polymers are essential for the high performance strain sensing. Next, simulation results of piezoresistivity of stretchable strain sensors by computational models are reported. Finally, potential applications of flexible strain sensors are described. This survey reveals that flexible, skin-mountable, and wearable strain sensors have potential in diverse applications while several grand challenges have to be still overcome.

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

2015


Thumb xl publications toc
Actively controlled fibrillar friction surfaces

Marvi, H, Han, Y, Sitti, M

Applied Physics Letters, 106(5):051602, AIP Publishing, January 2015 (article)

Abstract
In this letter, we propose a technique by which we can actively adjust frictional properties of elastic fibrillar structures in different directions. Using a mesh attached to a two degree-of-freedom linear stage, we controlled the active length and the tilt angle of fibers, independently. Thus, we were able to achieve desired levels of friction forces in different directions and significantly improve passive friction anisotropies observed in the same fiber arrays. The proposed technique would allow us to readily control the friction anisotropy and the friction magnitude of fibrillar structures in any planar direction.

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

2015

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

2014


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Mechanics of Load–Drag–Unload Contact Cleaning of Gecko-Inspired Fibrillar Adhesives

Abusomwan, U. A., Sitti, M.

Langmuir, 30(40):11913-11918, American Chemical Society, 2014 (article)

Project Page [BibTex]

2014

Project Page [BibTex]


Thumb xl publications toc
Geckogripper: A soft, inflatable robotic gripper using gecko-inspired elastomer micro-fiber adhesives

Song, S., Majidi, C., Sitti, M.

In Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2014), 2014 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on, pages: 4624-4629, September 2014 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper proposes GeckoGripper, a novel soft, inflatable gripper based on the controllable adhesion mechanism of gecko-inspired micro-fiber adhesives, to pick-and-place complex and fragile non-planar or planar parts serially or in parallel. Unlike previous fibrillar structures that use peel angle to control the manipulation of parts, we developed an elastomer micro-fiber adhesive that is fabricated on a soft, flexible membrane, increasing the adaptability to non-planar three-dimensional (3D) geometries and controllability in adhesion. The adhesive switching ratio (the ratio between the maximum and minimum adhesive forces) of the developed gripper was measured to be around 204, which is superior to previous works based on peel angle-based release control methods. Adhesion control mechanism based on the stretch of the membrane and superior adaptability to non-planar 3D geometries enable the micro-fibers to pick-and-place various 3D parts as shown in demonstrations.

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Staying sticky: contact self-cleaning of gecko-inspired adhesives

Mengüç, Y., Röhrig, M., Abusomwan, U., Hölscher, H., Sitti, M.

Journal of The Royal Society Interface, 11(94):20131205, The Royal Society, 2014 (article)

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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The optimal shape of elastomer mushroom-like fibers for high and robust adhesion

Aksak, B., Sahin, K., Sitti, M.

Beilstein journal of nanotechnology, 5(1):630-638, Beilstein-Institut, 2014 (article)

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]

2013


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Contact compliance effects in the frictional response of bioinspired fibrillar adhesives

Piccardo, M., Chateauminois, A., Fretigny, C., Pugno, N. M., Sitti, M.

Journal of The Royal Society Interface, 10(83):20130182, The Royal Society, 2013 (article)

Project Page [BibTex]

2013

Project Page [BibTex]


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Enhanced fabrication and characterization of gecko-inspired mushroom-tipped microfiber adhesives

Song, J., Mengüç, Y., Sitti, M.

Journal of Adhesion Science and Technology, 27(17):1921-1932, Routledge, 2013 (article)

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]

2012


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Effect of retraction speed on adhesion of elastomer fibrillar structures

Abusomwan, U., Sitti, M.

Applied Physics Letters, 101(21):211907, AIP, 2012 (article)

Project Page [BibTex]

2012

Project Page [BibTex]


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Gecko-Inspired Controllable Adhesive Structures Applied to Micromanipulation

Mengüç, Y., Yang, S. Y., Kim, S., Rogers, J. A., Sitti, M.

Advanced Functional Materials, 22(6):1245-1245, WILEY-VCH Verlag, 2012 (article)

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]

2011


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Waalbot II: Adhesion recovery and improved performance of a climbing robot using fibrillar adhesives

Murphy, M. P., Kute, C., Mengüç, Y., Sitti, M.

The International Journal of Robotics Research, 30(1):118-133, SAGE Publications Sage UK: London, England, 2011 (article)

Project Page [BibTex]

2011

Project Page [BibTex]


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Piezoelectric polymer fiber arrays for tactile sensing applications

Sümer, B., Aksak, B., Şsahin, K., Chuengsatiansup, K., Sitti, M.

Sensor Letters, 9(2):457-463, American Scientific Publishers, 2011 (article)

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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The effect of aspect ratio on adhesion and stiffness for soft elastic fibres

Aksak, B., Hui, C., Sitti, M.

Journal of The Royal Society Interface, 8(61):1166-1175, The Royal Society, 2011 (article)

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Enhancing adhesion of biologically inspired polymer microfibers with a viscous oil coating

Cheung, E., Sitti, M.

The Journal of Adhesion, 87(6):547-557, Taylor & Francis Group, 2011 (article)

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]

2010


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An experimental analysis of elliptical adhesive contact

Sümer, B., Onal, C. D., Aksak, B., Sitti, M.

Journal of Applied Physics, 107(11):113512, AIP, 2010 (article)

Project Page [BibTex]

2010

Project Page [BibTex]


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Enhanced wet adhesion and shear of elastomeric micro-fiber arrays with mushroom tip geometry and a photopolymerized p (DMA-co-MEA) tip coating

Glass, P., Chung, H., Washburn, N. R., Sitti, M.

Langmuir, 26(22):17357-17362, American Chemical Society, 2010 (article)

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Microstructured elastomeric surfaces with reversible adhesion and examples of their use in deterministic assembly by transfer printing

Kim, Seok, Wu, Jian, Carlson, Andrew, Jin, Sung Hun, Kovalsky, Anton, Glass, Paul, Liu, Zhuangjian, Ahmed, Numair, Elgan, Steven L, Chen, Weiqiu, others

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107(40):17095-17100, National Acad Sciences, 2010 (article)

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Enhanced adhesion of dopamine methacrylamide elastomers via viscoelasticity tuning

Chung, H., Glass, P., Pothen, J. M., Sitti, M., Washburn, N. R.

Biomacromolecules, 12(2):342-347, American Chemical Society, 2010 (article)

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]

2009


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Enhanced adhesion by gecko-inspired hierarchical fibrillar adhesives

Murphy, M. P., Kim, S., Sitti, M.

ACS applied materials \& interfaces, 1(4):849-855, American Chemical Society, 2009 (article)

Project Page [BibTex]

2009

Project Page [BibTex]


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Enhanced reversible adhesion of dopamine methacrylamide-coated elastomer microfibrillar structures under wet conditions

Glass, P., Chung, H., Washburn, N. R., Sitti, M.

Langmuir, 25(12):6607-6612, ACS Publications, 2009 (article)

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Gecko-Inspired Directional and Controllable Adhesion

Murphy, M. P., Aksak, B., Sitti, M.

Small, 5(2):170-175, WILEY-VCH Verlag, 2009 (article)

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Reversible dry micro-fibrillar adhesives with thermally controllable adhesion

Kim, S., Sitti, M., Xie, T., Xiao, X.

Soft Matter, 5(19):3689-3693, Royal Society of Chemistry, 2009 (article)

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]

2008


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Gecko inspired micro-fibrillar adhesives for wall climbing robots on micro/nanoscale rough surfaces

Aksak, B., Murphy, M. P., Sitti, M.

In Robotics and Automation, 2008. ICRA 2008. IEEE International Conference on, pages: 3058-3063, 2008 (inproceedings)

Project Page [BibTex]

2008

Project Page [BibTex]


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Modeling the soft backing layer thickness effect on adhesion of elastic microfiber arrays

Long, R., Hui, C., Kim, S., Sitti, M.

Journal of Applied Physics, 104(4):044301, AIP, 2008 (article)

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Fabrication and Characterization of Biologically Inspired Mushroom-Shaped Elastomer Microfiber Arrays

Kim, S., Sitti, M.

In ASME 2008 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, pages: 839-847, 2008 (inproceedings)

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]

2007


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Enhanced friction of elastomer microfiber adhesives with spatulate tips

Kim, S., Aksak, B., Sitti, M.

Applied Physics Letters, 91(22):221913, AIP, 2007 (article)

Project Page [BibTex]

2007

Project Page [BibTex]


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Adhesion of biologically inspired vertical and angled polymer microfiber arrays

Aksak, B., Murphy, M. P., Sitti, M.

Langmuir, 23(6):3322-3332, ACS Publications, 2007 (article)

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Adhesion and anisotropic friction enhancements of angled heterogeneous micro-fiber arrays with spherical and spatula tips

Murphy, M. P., Aksak, B., Sitti, M.

Journal of Adhesion Science and Technology, 21(12-13):1281-1296, Taylor & Francis Group, 2007 (article)

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]

2006


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Biologically inspired polymer microfibers with spatulate tips as repeatable fibrillar adhesives

Kim, S., Sitti, M.

Applied Physics Letters, 89(26):261911-261911, AIP, 2006 (article)

Project Page [BibTex]

2006

2004


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Gecko inspired surface climbing robots

Menon, C., Murphy, M., Sitti, M.

In Robotics and Biomimetics, 2004. ROBIO 2004. IEEE International Conference on, pages: 431-436, 2004 (inproceedings)

Project Page [BibTex]

2004

Project Page [BibTex]


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Modeling and design of biomimetic adhesives inspired by gecko foot-hairs

Shah, G. J., Sitti, M.

In Robotics and Biomimetics, 2004. ROBIO 2004. IEEE International Conference on, pages: 873-878, 2004 (inproceedings)

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]

2003


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Synthetic gecko foot-hair micro/nano-structures as dry adhesives

Sitti, M., Fearing, R. S.

Journal of adhesion science and technology, 17(8):1055-1073, Taylor & Francis Group, 2003 (article)

Project Page [BibTex]

2003

Project Page [BibTex]

2002


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Evidence for van der Waals adhesion in gecko setae

Autumn, K., Sitti, M., Liang, Y. A., Peattie, A. M., Hansen, W. R., Sponberg, S., Kenny, T. W., Fearing, R., Israelachvili, J. N., Full, R. J.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 99(19):12252-12256, National Acad Sciences, 2002 (article)

Project Page [BibTex]

2002

Project Page [BibTex]


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Nanomolding based fabrication of synthetic gecko foot-hairs

Sitti, M., Fearing, R. S.

In Nanotechnology, 2002. IEEE-NANO 2002. Proceedings of the 2002 2nd IEEE Conference on, pages: 137-140, 2002 (inproceedings)

Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]