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Department Talks

An introduction to bladder cancer & challenges for translational research

Talk
  • 22 July 2019 • 10:30 AM - 22 April 2019 • 11:30 AM
  • Richard T Bryan
  • 2P4


  • Joseph B. Tracy
  • MPI-IS Stuttgart, Room 2P04

Magnetic fields and light can be used to assemble, manipulate, and heat nanoparticles (NPs) and to remotely actuate polymer composites. Simple soft robots will be presented, where incorporation of magnetic and plasmonic NPs makes them responsive to magnetic fields and light. Application of magnetic fields to dispersions of magnetic NPs drives their assembly into chains. Dipolar coupling within the chains is a source of magnetic anisotropy, and chains of magnetic NPs embedded in a polymer matrix can be used to program the response of soft robots, while still using simple architectures. Wavelength-selective photothermal triggering of shape recovery in shape memory polymers with embedded Au nanospheres and nanorods can be used to remotely drive sequential processes. Combining magnetic actuation and photothermal heating enables remote configuration, locking, unlocking, and reconfiguration of soft robots, thus increasing their capabilities. Composite and multifunctional NPs are of interest for expanding the properties and applications of NPs. Silica shells are desirable for facilitating functionalization with silanes and enhancing the stability of NPs. Methods for depositing thin silica shells with controlled morphologies onto Au nanorods and CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dot nanorods will be presented. Silica deposition can also be accompanied by etching and breakage of the core NPs. Assembly of Fe3O4 NPs onto silica-overcoated Au nanorods allows for magnetic manipulation, while retaining the surface plasmon resonance.

Organizers: Metin Sitti


  • Prof. Shu Yang
  • 2P04

Geometry is concerned with the properties of configurations of points, lines, and circles, while topology is concerned with space, dimension, and transformation. Geometry is also materials independent and scale invariant. By introducing holes and cuts in 2D sheets, we demonstrate dramatic shape change and super-conformability via expanding or collapsing of the hole arrays without deforming individual lattice units. When choosing the cuts and geometry correctly, we show folding into the third dimension, known as kirigami. The kirigami structures can be rendered pluripotent, that is changing into different 3D structures from the same 2D sheet. We explore their potential applications in energy efficient building facade, super-stretchable and shape conformable energy storage devices and medical devices, as well as bioinspired robotics. Programmable shape-shifting materials can take different physical forms to achieve multifunctionality in a dynamic and controllable manner. Through designs of geometric surface patterns, e.g. microchannels, we program the orientational elasticity in liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs), to direct folding of the 2D sheets into 3D shapes, which can be triggered by heat, light, and electric field. Taking this knowledge of guided inhomogeneous local deformations in LCEs, we then tackle the inverse problem – pre-programming geometry on a flat sheet to take an arbitrary desired 3D shape. Lastly, I will show the prospective of taking geometry to create smart fabrics and tendon-like filaments for soft robotic applications.


  • Jérôme Casas
  • 2P04

Insect chemical ecology is a mature, long standing field, with its own journal. By contrast, insect physical ecology is much less studied and the worked scattered. Using work done in my group, I will highlight locomotion, both in granular materials like sand and at the water surface as well as sensing, in particular olfaction and flow sensing. The bio-inspired implementations in MEMS technologies will be the closing chapter.

Organizers: Metin Sitti


  • Sangram Bagh
  • 2P04

The molecular connectivity between genes and proteins inside a cell shows a good degree of resemblance with complex electrical circuits. This inspires the possibility of engineering a cell similar to an engineering device by plugging in genetic logic circuits. This approach, which is loosely defined as synthetic biology is an emerging field of bioengineering, where scientist use electrical and computer engineering principle to re-program cellular functions with a potential to solve next generation challenges in medicine, materials, energy, and space travel. In this talk, we discuss our efforts to create artificial and complex chemical signal processing systems using genetic logic circuits and its applications in building a technology platform for microbial robotics. We further discuss our systems biology effort to understand the effect of microgravity on human and bacterial cells during space travel.

Organizers: Metin Sitti


  • Ingmar H. Riedel-Kruse
  • Max-Planck-Institute for Intelligent Systems, Heisenbergstraße 3, Stuttgart, Room 2P4

I will share my vision that microbiological systems should be as programmable, interactive, accessible, constructible, and useful as our personal electronic devices. Natural multi-cellular organisms and symbiotic systems achieve complex tasks through division of labor among cells. Such systems transcend current electronics and robotics in many ways, e.g., they synthesize chemicals, generate active physical forms, and self-replicate. Harnessing these features promises significant impact for manufacturing (bioelectronics / smart materials /swarm robotics), health (tissue engineering), chemistry (pathway modularization), ecology (bioremediation), biodesign (art), and more. My lab takes a synergistic bottom-up / top-down approach to achieve such transformative applications: (1) We utilize synthetic biology and biophysics approaches to engineer and understand multi-cell bacterial assemblies. We developed the first synthetic cell-cell adhesion toolbox [1] and optogenetic cell-surface adhesion toolbox (‘Biofilm Lithography’) [2]. Integration with standard synthetic biology components (e.g., for signaling, differentiation, logic) now enables a new intelligent materials paradigm that rests on versatile, modular, and composable smart particles (i.e., cells). (2) We pioneered ‘Interactive Biotechnology’ that enables humans to directly interact with living multi-cell assemblies in real-time. I will provide the rational for this interactivity, demonstrate multiple applications using phototactic Euglena cells (e.g., tangible museum exhibits [3], biology cloud experimentation labs [4], biotic video games [5]), and show how this technology aided the discovery of new microswimmer phototaxis control strategies [6]. Finally, I discuss architecture and swarm programming languages for future bio-electronic devices (i.e., ‘Biotic Processing Units’ – BPUs) [7,8]. REFs: [1] Glass, Cell ’18; [2] Jin, PNAS ’18; [3] Lee, CHI ACM ’15; [4] Hossain, Nature Biotech ‘16; [5] Cira, PLoS Biology ‘15; [6] Tsang, Nature Physics ’18; [7] Lam LOC ‘17; [8] Washington, PNAS ‘19.


  • Dr. František Mach
  • Stuttgart 2P4

The state-of-the-art robotic systems adopting magnetically actuated ferromagnetic bodies or even whole miniature robots have recently become a fast advancing technological field, especially at the nano and microscale. The mesoscale and above all multiscale magnetically guided robotic systems appear to be the advanced field of study, where it is difficult to reflect different forces, precision and also energy demands. The major goal of our talk is to discuss the challenges in the field of magnetically guided mesoscale and multiscale actuation, followed by the results of our research in the field of magnetic positioning systems and the magnetic soft-robotic grippers.

Organizers: Metin Sitti


  • Prof. Holger Stark
  • Stuttgart 2P4

Active motion of biological and artificial microswimmers is relevant in the real world, in microfluidics, and biological applications but also poses fundamental questions in non-equi- librium statistical physics. Mechanisms of single microswimmers either designed by nature or in the lab need to be understood and a detailed modeling of microorganisms helps to explore their complex cell design and their behavior. It also motivates biomimetic approaches. The emergent collective motion of microswimmers generates appealing dynamic patterns as a consequence of the non-equilibrium.

Organizers: Metin Sitti Zoey Davidson


  • Prof. Dr. Rahmi Oklu
  • 3P02

Minimally invasive approaches to vascular disease and cancer have revolutionized medicine. I will discuss novel approaches to vascular bleeding, aneurysm treatment and tumor ablation.

Organizers: Metin Sitti


  • Dr. Aude Bolopion and Dr. Mich
  • 2P4

This talk presents an overview of recent activities of FEMTO-ST institute in the field of micro-nanomanipulation fo both micro nano assembly and biomedical applications. Microrobotic systems are currently limited by the number of degree of freedom addressed and also are very limited by their throughput. Two ways can be considered to improve both the velocity and the degrees of freedom: non-contact manipulation and dexterous micromanipulation. Indeed in both ways movement including rotation and translation are done locally and are only limited by the micro-nano-objects inertia which is very low. It consequently enable to generate 6DOF and to induce high dynamics. The talk presents recent works which have shown that controlled trajectories in non contact manipulation enable to manipulate micro-objects in high speed. Dexterous manipulation on a 4 fingers microtweezers have been also experimented and show that in-hand micromanipulations are possible in micro-nanoscale based on original finger trajectory planning. These two approaches have been applied to perform micro-nano-assemby and biomedical operations